How to Set SMART Career Goals with Examples

Learn how to set SMART career goals with examples as you move up towards greatness in your professional journey whether in business, organization, or as an employee! Every man deserves to have a glimpse at growth-focused keynotes because it is the light to help them see the big light at the end of their professional career tunnel.

SMART, as the guiding light to excellence, is a theoretical acronym which is set up to be giving criteria to guide you in the setting of goals and objectives that are assumed to give better results, for example in project management, employee-performance management and personal development.

Embracing and supporting the use of SMART objectives can suggest that they can provide a clear road map for both the person setting the goal and the person evaluating their progress. These set of beneficiaries can range from persons of different professional circles.

Also, the person setting the goal is said to gain a clear understanding of what needs to be delivered and the person evaluating can then assess the outcome based on defined criteria. SMART criteria are commonly associated with Peter Drucker’s management by objectives concept.

The SMART goals mnemonic is indeed a smart way of conquering and efficiently managing challenges oftentimes to one’s big advantage. This creates a coping mechanism that helps you stay far above fear, anxieties, and business place worries.

With everyday pressure and life’s unpremeditated contingencies, the very advantages that are promised in the effective use of the SMART principles are important reasons why reading through this content on how to set SMART career goals with examples is essential!

Setting career goals as relating to your businesses, project execution, and many more is one thing, having the right information and important details about how to go about not just setting them but also achieving these goals is another effective step to goal realization. Let us check these easy steps out:

  •  Know That Goal Needs to Be Specific

The first step in creating a SMART goal is to make it specific. Consider your goal in quantifiable terms by asking yourself the following questions:

What do I want to accomplish?
Will achieving this goal have an important impact?
What actions will I need to take?

For Example:

Each month, I will distribute a budget report that shows our department’s current expenses in comparison to our allotted annual budget and I will highlight areas where we are overspending. Based on our current spending, I will offer suggestions on how to cut expenses so that we are back within budget.

  • Identifying with the Measurability of Your Goal

This step in the SMART process prompts you to apply methods of measuring your progress toward achieving your goal. Being measurable also takes into account any actions you would implement to help you further your progress toward your goal. For instance, this may take the form of tracking the time it takes you to complete an action or meet a milestone.

For Example:

I will distribute a budget report that shows our department’s current expenses in comparison to our allotted annual budget.

  • Believe Your Goal is Achievable

This aspect of the SMART strategy relates to your goal being achievable. Do you have the resources and time needed to achieve the goal? This may include gathering necessary data, asking team members for help and learning new skills. You’re more likely to be successful in your goal once it is specific, measurable and deemed achievable.

Read Also: Smartest Black People in the World

For Example:

I will distribute a budget report that shows our department’s current expenses in comparison to our allotted annual budget and I will highlight areas where we are overspending.

  • Understand the Relevance of Your Goal

A relevant goal will directly contribute to successful results. Keep in mind that every action you take should move you closer to your goal. In our example, a relevant goal will directly reduce expenses.

For Example:

I will distribute a budget report that shows our department’s current expenses in comparison to our allotted annual budget and I will highlight areas where we are overspending. Based on our current spending, I will offer suggestions on how to cut expenses so that we are back within budget.

  • Know Your Goal is Time-based

You’ll want to determine if your goal is a short-term or long-term goal or a combination of both. A time-based goal has a specific time deadline. From there, you can determine a timeline and set a schedule to meet deadlines and accomplish your objective.

Your timeline should also be realistic and allow you plenty of opportunities to make adjustments to your goal regarding its relevance, specificity and achievability. Consider the final step in the SMART process in the following example.

For Example:

Each month this year, I will distribute a budget report that shows our department’s current expenses in comparison to our allotted annual budget and I will highlight areas where we are overspending. Based on our current spending, I will offer suggestions on how to cut expenses so that we are back within budget.

  • Conclusion

However, you have to know that goals can change. This is why it is so important to set smaller achievable goals. You never know the changes your career plan may undergo, so understand that the SMART goal setting principles are utilizable regardless of size, depth, importance, to name but a few. You just have to learn when and how to recognize the boundaries in application.

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